Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

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Friday 10 July - 14:00-15:30 UNESCO Miollis - ROOM XVI

4419 - Climate science in the public sphere. Media coverage and communication devices analysis for effective policy implementation

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): J.-B. Comby (University Paris 2, Paris, France), P. Maugis (UMR C EA-C NRS-UVSQ, IPSL , Laboratoire des sciences du climat et de l'environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette, France)

Convener(s): M. Ha-Duong (CIRED, Nogent sur Marne, France)

14:00

Climate change journalism - communicating the science

E. Eide (Akershus University College for Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway), J. Painter (University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom), R. Kunelius (School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Tampere, Finland)

Abstract details
Climate change journalism - communicating the science

E. Eide (1) ; J. Painter (2) ; R. Kunelius (3)
(1) Akershus University College for Applied Sciences, Department for journalism and media studies, Oslo, Norway; (2) University of Oxford, Reuters school of journalism, Oxford, United Kingdom; (3) School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Tampere, Finland

Abstract content

Climate change journalism - communicating the science

 

The MediaClimate network presents the results of TV and newspaper representation of the IPCC AR5 reports in a large number of countries, analyzing the differing levels of attention and frames emerging when journalists in a variety of national contexts report on the latest results from climate scientists. To what extent are the carefully formulated scientific concepts, such as uncertainty, probability and degrees of likelihood present in the journalistic texts? Which voices are quoted, which genres are salient, and which recommendations are made by editors and journalists? To what extent are the IPCC results and recommendations related to peoples’ everyday experiences investigated in the media? Which challenges in reporting on a global scientific endeavour may be traced, and what are the perspectives for a more cosmopolitan (globally oriented) journalism?

Speakers: James Painter, Elisabeth Eide and Risto Kunelius. Convenor: Jean-Baptiste Comby

14:20

Building a vision for a low carbon society in France with non-violent communication methods, result from the R&Dialogue european project

M. Ha Duong (CNRS, Nogent sur Marne, France), M. Cherbib (CIRED (International Research Center on Environment and Development), Nogent sur Marne, France)

Abstract details
Building a vision for a low carbon society in France with non-violent communication methods, result from the R&Dialogue european project

M. Ha Duong (1) ; M. Cherbib (2)
(1) CNRS, CIRED, Nogent sur Marne, France; (2) CIRED (International Research Center on Environment and Development), Nogent sur Marne, France

Abstract content

As organisations and governments working towards the energy transition broaden their focus to include a large spectrum of society, they need processes capable of building deep understanding out of the diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and judgements oftheir stakeholders. Several countries have initiated large-scale social dialogues on the energy transition, demonstrating the difficulties inherent in implementing a genuinedialogue and integrating it into the democratic process.

This communication presents the results of the R&Dialogue project in France, a research-action to implement dialogue at the regional, the national and local levels using renewed tools to improve the practice of democracy.

14:30

Advancing climate mitigation efforts through dialogue with the Australian Public

P. Ashworth (University of Queensland,, Brisbane, Australia)

Abstract details
Advancing climate mitigation efforts through dialogue with the Australian Public

P. Ashworth (1)
(1) University of Queensland,, School of Social Sciences, Brisbane, Australia

Abstract content

There is no doubt the politicisation of climate change discussions in Australia have severely impacted the coordination of Australia’s mitigation actions.  Despite the lack of proactive action at the political level, many of the Australian public are concerned about climate change and its impact, but are at a loss as to what might be the best actions for them to take as part of the response to climate change. To help facilitate greater understanding of the portfolio of mitigation options, and raise awareness of actions that can be taken at the individual and community level, a number of engagement and dialogue opportunities have been undertaken. This paper will present the research findings from a range of activities that have been utilised to engaged with lay publics across Australia. As a result of this work we have been able to inform policy makers of public preferences, bring about a reduction in participant footprints and understand in more detail the Australian public’s preferences for engagement on the topic.  Processes used vary from kitchen table discussions; to large group processes - of up to 100 people in the room; citizens’ panels and interactive survey tools. The results generally confirm that the Australian public are concerned about action on climate change, tend to have a preference for renewable energy, but lack in-depth knowledge on the range of low carbon energy technologies.

14:40

How to rethink the Science-Societies debate about climate change?

L. Scotto D’apollonia (UM2, Montepellier, France), S. Blangy (CEFE-CNRS- UMR 5175, Montpellier, France), P. Maugis (UMR CEA-CNRS-UVSQ (UMR 8212), IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette , France)

Abstract details
How to rethink the Science-Societies debate about climate change?

L. Scotto D’apollonia (1) ; S. Blangy (2) ; P. Maugis (3)
(1) UM2, Liderf, Montepellier, France; (2) CEFE-CNRS- UMR 5175, Dynamique des Systémes socio-écologiques, Montpellier, France; (3) UMR CEA-CNRS-UVSQ (UMR 8212), IPSL, Laboratoire des sciences du climat et de l'environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette , France

Abstract content

The question of climate change is increasingly drawing consensus among the scientific community. However, there is an obvious and continuous lack of dialog between scientists and stakeholders (institutions and civil society). How can we foster debate on climate issues between academics, decision-makers and the citizens of the World?

 

Such a dialog is impaired in different ways. We will focus on some of those that are particularly pregnant and will propose mechanisms to address them. The first one lies in polemics and controversies related to uncertainties in the scientific knowledge and the way they are accounted for and communicated. Pascal Maugis will show how uncertainties should be reported in order to go beyond them and eventually make them an opportunity for enlighted and shared decision making for the management of the risks induced by climate change.

Second, "citizen science" about the climate issues remain isolated, weakly coordinated and for the most part unknown to the general public. Moreover, social demands vary a lot, addressing for example educational issues, adaptation measures or public debates. Because the climatologists who intervene in the public space are at  the frontier between science, expertise for territorial policies and political strategies, they bear contradictory constrains. This may result in uneffective - or even counter-productive - discourses. Lionel Scotto d'Appolonia will analyse such situations using the example of climate controversies. This suggests to strenghten the path towards participatory science : A new form of the "Palaver Tree" (L’Arbres à Palabres in french). Inspired by African tradition, the palaver tree is a meeting place where villagers « freely » discuss social and political problems. Its modernized form, scientifically enriched by Human and Social Sciences, will be explained.

Finally, participatory citizen expertize and science have met several success. Sylvie Blangy will present one such success story on tourism adaptation in Québec.

 

This presentation is set-up and facilitated by the PARCS (Participatory Action Research and Citizen Sciences) research working group: a group including 50 scientists and NGO members from diverse research fields. The objective of PARCS is to synchronize various initiatives of "citizen science" about the climate issues. The PARCS group is conceived as a field-laboratory to explore new ways to question Science-Society relationships, by putting into synergy all demands and initiatives from citizens and institutions. The "palaver tree" is one of its three research axes.