Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

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Wednesday 8 July - 16:30-18:00 UNESCO Fontenoy - ROOM XII

2216 - Climate smart forestry- Integrating mitigation and adaptation into sustainable development

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): C. Orazio (EFI, cestas, France)

Convener(s): S. Luque (IRSTEA National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, St-Martin-d’Hères, cedex, France), J.L. Peron, R. Jandl (Forest Research Center (BFW), Vienne, Austria)

16:30

Forest carbon conservation and management: integration with sustainable forest management for multiple resource values and ecosystem services

J.-L. Peyron (ECOFOR, PARIS, France), A. Sample (Pinchot Institute for conservation, Washington, United States of America)

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Forest carbon conservation and management: integration with sustainable forest management for multiple resource values and ecosystem services

JL. Peyron (1) ; A. Sample (2)
(1) ECOFOR, PARIS, France; (2) Pinchot Institute for conservation, Washington, United States of America

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Forest carbon management is an important consideration in temperate forests as well as tropical forests.  It is estimated that US forests absorb up to 15 percent of total US carbon emissions, or more than 200 Tg yr -1.  Recent research suggests that this net carbon sink is declining, and that US forests could become a net carbon source within the next few decades unless decisive action is taken in the near term to alter this trajectory.   Annual per capita carbon emissions in the US are triple those of France, and more than eight times those of Brazil or Indonesia, so many in the US forestry community consider it a moral responsibility to avoid this possible future.  This paper will summarize ongoing research to determine whether carbon management is compatible with forest resource sustainability (continued production for a variety of goods and services), and whether forest carbon management enhances or detracts from other ecosystem services such as water and biodiversity.  Examples are drawn from private forest lands managed primarily for timber and other economic values, and from public forest lands in which management for specific forest uses, values, and services are mandated by law or policy.

16:45

Dr Peter, freer-smith , Forest research, UK, peter.freer-smith@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

P. Freer-Smith (forestry comission, Surrey, United Kingdom)

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Dr Peter, freer-smith , Forest research, UK, peter.freer-smith@forestry.gsi.gov.uk
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17:00

Understanding and directing small-scale private forest owner behaviour towards climate change adaptation

U. Pröbstl-Haider (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria), R. Jandl (Forest Research Center , Vienne, Austria), H. Formayer, (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria), M. Suda, (Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany), W. Haider (Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada), N. Mostegl (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria)

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Understanding and directing small-scale private forest owner behaviour towards climate change adaptation

U. Pröbstl-Haider (1) ; R. Jandl (2) ; H. Formayer, (1) ; M. Suda, (3) ; W. Haider (4) ; N. Mostegl (1)
(1) University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria; (2) Forest Research Center , Bfw, Vienne, Austria; (3) Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany; (4) Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada

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Climate change will affect many productive forests across Austria, which may lead to significant economic loss, but also depicts various opportunities for future management. While the Federal Forest Service already takes climate change into account, little is known about adaptation of small-scale private forest owners, who manage 56% of Austria’s forests. Consequently, this project will investigate human dimensions of climate change and small-scale forest owners’ adaptation strategies. The main focus lies on their climate change perception, ways to influence their implementation of adaptation methods, the rising of their awareness of possible risks of inactivity, and the enhancement of their transition to resilient forests. The key challenge is to “re-interest” this group in their property and to increase the awareness of their required contribution. For this purpose, the project develops innovative concepts for attracting as many forest owners as possible to implement adaptive measures. The core of the study builds a questionnaire combined with a discrete choice experiment, which aims at acquiring a thorough understanding of the salient factors influencing decision-making processes. This innovative methodologically approach initially combines forest growth modeling and visualization of potential effects within a stated preference method.

17:10

How forests can support adaptation of landscapes systems to mitigate climate change? A landscape approach to sustainable forest management

S. Luque (IRSTEA National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, St-Martin-d'Hères, cedex, France)

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How forests can support adaptation of landscapes systems to mitigate climate change? A landscape approach to sustainable forest management

S. Luque (1)
(1) IRSTEA - National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, Mountain ecosystems, Grenoble, France

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The world’s forests are in a state of flux due to land-use and climate change, deforestation, afforestation, wildfires, insects and pathogen outbreaks. In the face of both anthropogenic and natural forces there is an increasing need to assess the value of our forests. The incorporation of the ecosystem service (ES) concept into the framework of forest management stems from a need to create a more holistic perception of forests, recognizing not only their economic value, but also their cultural and ecological values including their regulation capability. Thus, requirements of an optimized forest production and an environmental quality improvement represent a true challenge for the years to come. A fast reorganization of the system is needed in order to find the right balance between management within a forest ecosystem services approach at different scales. In particular, we need to consider a valorisation of wood resources and production, thorough knowledge of their vulnerability within an intensification management scenario.

As climate changes, societal demands for goods and services from forests are also changing. The recent decision of European government leaders to increase the share of renewable energy in Europe to 20% by 2020 is expected to result in a much greater demand for forest biomass for bio-energy generation. This higher demand will intensify the competition for resources between forest industry, the energy sector, and nature conservation/other protective functions and services (including biodiversity, protection from natural hazards, landscape aesthetics, recreation and tourism and climate regulation).  A comprehensive and integrative approach from the plot level to the landscape level is needed through collaborative tools.  Such tools also should inform on what level of spatial scale adaptation measures can be effective: can they just do it by managing the land within their jurisdiction, or are they dependent on changes at broader scales and do they need to collaborate with other land managers around? Scenario analysis and planning options for the future will be also presented based on specific case studies as exemplars. The work opens questions regarding the needs for a comprehensive adaptive forest management under changing environmental conditions to improve forest management in a wide range of territories.

The challenge that lays ahead demands gaining awareness of the increasing pressures on forests and forest resources and concern about the continuous changes in climate conditions that will increase forest degradation for what a holistic approach towards integrative solutions is needed.

 

17:20

The loop effect: quantifying the mitigation potential of the forest sector when adaptation strategies are also taken into account. A case study for France

A. Barkaoui (INRA, Nancy, France), J.-D. Bontemps (AgroParisTech, Nancy, France), S. Caurla (INRA, Nancy, France), P. Delacote (INRA, Nancy, France), L. Antonello (AgroParisTech, Nancy, France), P. Mérian (National Institute of Geographic and Forestry Information, Nancy, France)

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The loop effect: quantifying the mitigation potential of the forest sector when adaptation strategies are also taken into account. A case study for France

A. Barkaoui (1) ; JD. Bontemps (2) ; S. Caurla (1) ; P. Delacote (3) ; L. Antonello (4) ; P. Mérian (5)
(1) INRA, Laboratoire d'economie forestière, Nancy, France; (2) AgroParisTech, Lerfob, Nancy, France; (3) INRA, Economics, Nancy, France; (4) AgroParisTech, Laboratoire d'economie forestière, Nancy, France; (5) National Institute of Geographic and Forestry Information, Nancy, France

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Objectives: (1) quantify the contribution of the French forest-wood product chain in terms of sequestration and substitution of carbon when we account for forest response to climate change and consequent forest managers adaptations; (2) assess the effects of the incertitude of current climate scenarios on the above carbon balance; (3) assess the potential consequences of an early introduction of adaptation measures.

Methodology: We use a spatially-explicit bio-economic Model of the French Forest Sector (FFSM++) that is able to consider and integrate: (a) effects of climate change over forest dynamic; (b) forest investment decisions (among groups of species) according to expected profitability (conditionally to cc); (c) market effects in terms of supply, consumption and trade of wood products depending on the stock of forest resources. Having both forest dynamic and forest products included, we can evaluate the carbon balance considering the following elements: (a) carbon sequestered in live and death biomass in the forest; (b) carbon sequestered in wood products; (c) carbon substituted when wood is used in place of fossil fuels; (d) carbon released by forest operations.

Results: When we run the model for the next century using IPCC A1B scenarios the average sequestration rate is 43.88 Mt CO2 eq. y-1 while the net energy substitution emissions is 13.59 Mt CO2 y-1. Together they form 16% of the French 2010 emissions (361 Mt CO2}). The sequestered carbon is highly due to an increasing forest stock, that however tends to peak in about 100 years. In A2 and B1 scenarios the forest balance decreases by 0.51% and 1.20% respectively. Testing 12 different climatic models for the A1B scenario we obtain a coefficient of variation of 2.47% for the overall carbon balance. Allowing forest managers to have a perfect foresight on future climate favour broadleaved species but has a limited effect on the carbon balance.

17:30

Panel discussion

C. Orazio (EFI, cestas, France), J.-L. Peyron (ECOFOR, PARIS, France), R. Jandl (Austrian Research Centre for Forests, Vienna, Austria), S. Luque (IRSTEA National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, St-Martin-d’Hères, cedex, France), A. Sample (Pinchot Institute for conservation, Washington, United States of America), P. Freer-Smith (Forestry Commission, Farnham, United Kingdom)

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Panel discussion
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