Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

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Wednesday 8 July - 16:30-18:00 UNESCO Fontenoy - ROOM XI

2225 - Climate Smart Agriculture: Propaganda or Paradigm Shift?

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): T. Long (Wageningen UR, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands)

Convener(s): P. Caron (Cirad, Montpellier, France), C. Lamanna (World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi, Kenya)

16:30

From a global science conference towards UNFCCC negotiations: mobilizing science for transitions

P. Caron (Montpellier)

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From a global science conference towards UNFCCC negotiations: mobilizing science for transitions

P. Caron (1)
(1) Cirad, General direction, Montpellier

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This presentation aims at presenting the main out comes from the 3rd Global Science Conference on Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) in Montpellier, France, 16-18 March 2015 where more than 600 researchers and 150 stakeholders and policy makers from 75 countries and 5 continents convened. CSA is a framework that mobilizes synergies and can lead to innovative and comprehensive solutions at local, regional and global levels. Delegates also confirmed that CSA solutions exist and can be brought into reality provided favorable conditions.

Agriculture was acknowledged as a sector particularly vulnerable to climate change, which impacts the livelihoods of the world’s poorest people. This places increased strain on global food systems, especially since expectations for meeting demand for food will change tremendously within the next 40 years. Agriculture has also a central role in strongly reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lies therefore at the heart of complex challenges to be addressed. CSA invites researchers, practitioners and policy makers to explore solutions combining three pillars, food security, climate change adaptation and mitigation, underpinning sustainable landscapes and food systems. This is essential since the sector is facing unprecedented uncertainty and risks: synergies have to be looked at and trade-offs addressed. Recognizing that agriculture is a pivotal sector for international negotiations on sustainable development and climate change, CSA therefore provides a framework for looking at necessary transitions.

The main recommendations were as follows: (i) agriculture in the future must also address the challenges of sustainable food systems and landscapes; (ii): based upon a renewed research agenda that addresses a more complex set of objectives, researchers and practitioners must engage to build evidence and design the trajectories for multiple transformative transitions of climate-smart agriculture; (iii) the future relies upon policy, institutional and financing decisions and particularly upon the involvement of policy makers, development agencies, civil society and the private sector with researchers and research institutions in innovation platforms.

The strengthening of CSA scientific community must be pursued and better engaged in interfacing with policy makers, promoting scientific diplomacy. Their capacity to develop relevant global research programs and joint initiatives to address as from now questions that will be key in the future should be supported and stimulated through international cooperation platforms.

16:38

Keynote Speaker

J.F. Soussana (INRA, Paris, France)

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Keynote Speaker
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16:46

Decision-support framework for targeting investment towards climate-smart agriculture practices and programs

C. Corner-Dolloff, (International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia), A. M. Loboguerrero, (CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) , Cali, Colombia), M. Lizarazo (CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) , Cali, Colombia), A. Nowak (International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia), F. Howland (International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia), N. Andrieu (Centre de coopération Internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD), Montpellier, France), A. Jarvis (International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia)

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Decision-support framework for targeting investment towards climate-smart agriculture practices and programs

C. Corner-Dolloff, (1) ; AM. Loboguerrero, (2) ; M. Lizarazo (2) ; A. Nowak (1) ; F. Howland (1) ; N. Andrieu (3) ; A. Jarvis (1)
(1) International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Decision and policy analysis research area, Cali, Colombia; (2) CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) , Ccafs latinoamerica, Cali, Colombia; (3) Centre de coopération Internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD), L’unité mixte de recherche innovation et développement dans l’agriculture et l’agroalimentaire, Montpellier, France

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Unprecedented impacts of climate change on agricultural systems around the world coupled with increasing food demand underlie the urgency of building a more productive, resilient, and low-emission agricultural development model - one that is climate-smart. Establishing climate-smart agriculture (CSA) systems requires investment in concrete on-farm practices and broader programs to establish implementation at scales that will transform systems to address food security and development goals in the face of climate change. The CSA Prioritization Framework (CSA-PF) was designed by scientists at CIAT and CCFAS to guide actors at multiple levels in their effort to identify best-bet CSA investment portfolios through scientific and participatory evaluation of the broad set of applicable practices for a given context. The CSA-PF is a CSA implementation planning and policy support tool aimed at governments, donors, non-governmental organizations, and local actors. The framework explicitly targets investments that diminish trade-offs between productivity increases, gains in adaptive capacity, and lowering emissions contributions from agriculture. Given the various needs of potential users and investment targets, the CS-PF can be adapted to stakeholders’ needs and resources. It has been designed as a four phase process, but current pilots has varied this approach, adding additional analyses and decision taking points as needed. The first phase leads the main user of the prioritization process, in collaboration with a team of experts, to identify the objectives, scope of the study based on vulnerable areas  and production systems key for food security, and the associated climatic and non-climatic challenges to be addressed through CSA interventions. The process then continues with the development of a long list of CSA practices applicable to the selected region(s) and production systems, and the identification of indicators to assess the practice’s impacts on productivity, adaptation and mitigation. In Phase 2, stakeholders validate these results through participatory workshops and select a shorter list of CSA practices for further investigation based on the analyses from the first phase. An economic analysis, most often a cost-benefit analysis, is conducted in Phase 3 for the short-listed practices. A second workshop for data validation is held in Phase 4, where stakeholders discuss strategies to minimize trade-offs, to increase synergies between practices, and to minimize barriers to adoptions. The process results in the collaborative development of CSA investment portfolios. Through a comparative case study approach, this paper also illustrates the results from implementing the CSA-PF in Colombia, Guatemala, and Mali, where the prioritization objectives vary from strengthening current national agricultural and climate change policy (Guatemala), to articulating governmental and non-governmental actors around CSA actions (Mali), to scaling out CSA initiatives with local community groups (Colombia). Opportunities and challenges related to the different approaches to using the framework are discussed and recommendations for down-scaling the CSA-PF and establishing multi-level planning platforms are formulated, thus contributing to the wider goal of informing agriculture and climate change policy and decision-making. 

16:54

The adoption of Climate Smart Agriculture innovations: a summary of an EU project

V. Blok (Wageningen UR, Wageningen, Netherlands), T. Long (Wageningen UR, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands)

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The adoption of Climate Smart Agriculture innovations: a summary of an EU project

V. Blok (1) ; T. Long (2)
(1) Wageningen UR, Mst, Wageningen, Netherlands; (2) Wageningen UR, MST, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands

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Agriculture and its supply chains will be profoundly impacted by actions to mitigate against, and adapt to climate change. The emerging concept of Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) is one response to this challenge, involving the simultaneous increasing of agricultural productivity and incomes, adaptation and the building of resilience, and the reductions of GHG emissions (FAO, 2010).

Whilst heavily advanced within developing country contexts, CSA is also forming a strategic priority within Europe. Technological innovations are signalled as playing a critical role in the transition towards CSA. However, the diffusion and adoption of technological innovations within OECD countries has been slow (del Río González 2005). This is due to the presence of social and economic barriers, including poor market incentives and low levels of awareness.

The development and refinement of appropriate business models for CSA, increasing awareness and the aligning of national and EU policies have been highlighted as responses to enhance the transition to CSA.

Results from a Climate KiC pathfinder project on CSA will be presented during this key note talk. This ongoing project seeks to increase the adoption and diffusion of CSA technological innovations across the EU by stimulating both supply and demand. The presentation will provide an overview of the projects approach and results to date, which will include consideration of:

  • The role and form of inhibiting social and economic factors.
  • The role of business models in enhancing CSA technologies, and identifying critical issues that shape successful CSA business models.
  • Current policy and regulatory impacts, and how these could be altered in the future to further the diffusion of CSA technologies and practices.
  • The development of services to boost CSA in Europe. 
17:02

Poster presentations

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Poster presentations
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17:30

Panel discussion

P. Caron (Cirad, Montpellier, France), B. Hubert (Association Agropolis International, Montpellier , France), J.-L. Chotte (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France), E. Torquebiau (CIRAD, Montpellier, France), . B. Campbell (CGIAR, -, Denmark)

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