Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

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Wednesday 8 July - 17:30-19:00 UPMC Jussieu - ROOM 309 - Block 24/34

4413 (a) - Technology, transformations and capabilities in developing countries

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): H. De Coninck (Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands)

Convener(s): E. Verdolini (FEEM Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Milano, Italy), A. Ely (STEPS Centre, Sussex, United Kingdom)

17:30

Building pro-poor, low carbon innovation systems through international and indigenous efforts

R. Byrne (University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom), D. Ockwell (University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom), A. Ely (STEPS Centre, Sussex, United Kingdom)

Abstract details
Building pro-poor, low carbon innovation systems through international and indigenous efforts

A. Ely (1) ; D. Ockwell (2)
(1) STEPS Centre, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, Sussex, United Kingdom; (2) University of Sussex, School of global studies, Brighton, United Kingdom

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Contribution for Panel N° 4413 - Sustainable energy for all

 

Local innovation capabilities have long been recognised as a key requirement in forging new innovation trajectories and low carbon development pathways. Building on the foundational literature from innovation studies, a swathe of recent research has highlighted the processes through which these have emerged at national levels, in particular in emerging technological nations such as China and India. In most of these cases, indigenous learning processes have led to the build-up of knowledge and capabilities within a usually small subset of elite firms.

 

At national levels (e.g. in the Chinese and Brazilian cases) the role of central policies and investment from strong development banks has combined with more local efforts to build innovation systems in poorer regions. Relatively few scholars have investigated the governance challenges associated with centralised policies and the sometimes divergent interests of provincial/ regional actors. At international levels, scholars have investigated the potential for collaborative research and development activities as a way of facilitating technology transfer and low carbon innovation.

 

Informed by some of these insights, international efforts are underway through the UNFCCC to try to provide external support for low carbon innovation of a transformative nature. In particular, the Climate Technology Centre and Network, as well as the Green Climate Fund, which claims transformative ambitions, promise to enhance developing countries’ low carbon innovation activities. ‘New donor nations’ may also play an important role (for example the BRICS bank). These efforts raise a fundamental question, echoing earlier innovation studies work that has pointed to the difficulties of purposive creation of innovation systems that have elsewhere emerged through complex indigenous interactions. How do international (donor) efforts co-ordinate with indigenous processes to foster the emergence of dynamic low carbon innovation systems?

 

This paper discusses some of the innovation systems literature that can inform our answers to these questions, especially the work of the Latin American school that has highlighted the challenges of implementing policies to build innovation systems that aim to emulate those that have emerged elsewhere.  It will link to recent research carried out by the STEPS Centre around low carbon innovation capabilities and the role of ‘system builders’ in China and Sub-Saharan Africa.  Linking this to the wider innovation studies literature raises questions for international processes that aim to foster innovation for alternative trajectories in low and middle-income countries. 

17:50

Facilitating technological change to manage energy and climate challenges in developing countries

A. Sagar (Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi, India)

Abstract details
Facilitating technological change to manage energy and climate challenges in developing countries

A. Sagar (1)
(1) Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Humanities and Social sciences, Delhi, India

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It is well understood that new and improved technologies will play a key role in efforts to address the energy and climate challenges facing developing countries.  But a range of resources and capabilities – technical, financial, business, policy, etc. – needs to be marshalled to facilitate the development and/or adaptation of such technologies and their deployment at scale.  Drawing examples from India, this talk will illustrate the kinds of resources and capabilities that may be needed for different technologies at different stages of their technology cycle and how these might be brought together in a systematic fashion. In doing so, I will highlight the critical role of “innovation systems operators” in this process, as entities that identify innovation gaps as well as ways to overcome them by bringing together and coordinating relevant actors and expertise, appropriate finance and policy solutions.  I will also suggest that such entities are a critical element of the capabilities to manage energy and climate challenges in developing countries where innovation systems often are not well organized.

18:00

The role of partnerships in enhancing the transfer and diffusion of climate change technologies

A. Abdel-Latif (ICTSD, Geneva, Switzerland)

Abstract details
The role of partnerships in enhancing the transfer and diffusion of climate change technologies

A. Abdel-Latif (1)
(1) ICTSD, Geneva, Switzerland

Abstract content

 

 

The decision to establish a Technology Mechanism (TM), at the Cancun conference in 2010, was an important milestone in efforts to advance the effective implementation of the technology transfer provisions of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Since then, the two bodies of the TM – the Technology Executive Committee (TEC), more akin to a policy body, and the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN), the Mechanism’s operational arm -have begun to carry out their work and activities.

 

However, the role of partnerships in enhancing the transfer and diffusion of climate change technologies has not received significant attention in the process of the TM’s operationalization or in the work programs and activities of both the TEC and CTCN. Yet the mandates of both bodies include provisions to foster such partnerships. For instance, the mandate of the CTCN states that one of its functions is “facilitating international partnerships among public and private stakeholders to accelerate the innovation and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing country Parties.”   

 

At the same time, recent years have witnessed a number of growing partnerships involving public and private entities, particularly in the context of bilateral clean energy and technology cooperation arrangements such as the US-China Renewable Energy Forum. These partnerships also address intellectual property rights (IPRs) in a pragmatic and constructive manner which could provide useful lessons for overcoming the polarized debate on this topic in the context of current climate negotiations.

 

The objective of this proposal would be to explore how can partnerships contribute to a strengthened TM that could be a possible basis for agreement on a technology package at COP 21 in Paris.

 

 

 

18:10

Panel discussion:

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Panel discussion:
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18:10

Technology, transformations and capabilities in developing countries

H. De Coninck (Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands)

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Technology, transformations and capabilities in developing countries
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18:15

Sustainable Energy for All

L. Gomez-Echeverri (UN SE4All, Vienna, Austria)

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Sustainable Energy for All
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18:20

The Climate Technology Centre and Network

J. Uosukainen (UNEP, Copenhagen, Denmark)

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The Climate Technology Centre and Network
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18:25

Green Climate Fund Secretariat

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Green Climate Fund Secretariat
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