Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

Menu
  • Home
  • Zoom Interactive Programme
Cliquer pour fermer

Friday 10 July - 11:30-13:00 UNESCO Fontenoy - ROOM IV

L4.4 - Multilevel Governance of Climate Change

Large Parallel Session

Chair(s): S. Agrawala (OECD, Paris, France)

Lead Convener(s): D. Victor (University of California, San Diego, United States of America)

11:30

The Emergence of new structures for global governance: will ‘bottom up' actually work ?

D. Victor (University of California, San Diego, United States of America)

Abstract details
The Emergence of new structures for global governance: will ‘bottom up' actually work ?

D. Victor (1)
(1) University of California, San Diego, United States of America

Abstract content

With the failure of integrated, top-down bargaining strategies, analysts and diplomats have now turned to bottom-up methods such as “building blocks” and “climate clubs” to coordinate national climate change policies and to avoid persistent diplomatic deadlock.  Decomposition of the grand problem of climate change into smaller units is a crucial first step towards effective cooperation. But given the great uncertainty of the feasibility and costs of potential solutions, this bottom-up approach will only work if it is supported by institutions that promote joint exploration of possibilities by public and private actors along with the scaling up of successes.  As politics precludes creating many of these institutions under the consensus-oriented decision rules of the UN system, engaged outsiders—including especially clubs or building blocks that can learn in the face of uncertainty—working in parallel with the UN diplomatic process will have to provide them.

 

11:47

Delivering ambitious climate action and the role of multilevel governance

J. Corfee-Morlot (OECD, Paris, France)

Abstract details
Delivering ambitious climate action and the role of multilevel governance

J. Corfee-Morlot (1)
(1) OECD, Paris, France

Abstract content

This presentation presents a framework for multilevel governance, showing that advancing governance of climate change across all levels of government and relevant stakeholders is crucial to avoid policy gaps between local action plans and national policy frameworks (vertical integration) and to encourage cross-scale learning between relevant departments or institutions in local and regional governments (horizontal dimension). Vertical and horizontal integration allows two-way benefits: locally-led or bottom-up where local initiatives influence national action and nationally-led or top-down where enabling frameworks empower local players. The most promising frameworks combine the two into hybrid models of policy dialogue where the lessons learnt are used to modify and fine-tune enabling frameworks and disseminated horizontally, achieving more efficient local implementation of climate strategies. Such integration generates benefits at all stages of the policy process. This includes agenda setting and strategic planning, to encourage political leadership and stakeholders' support; policy formulation and approval to promote long-term vision and near term action; local implementation to overcome obstacles, build necessary capacity, and establish reliable financing for action; feedback and evaluation; and dissemination to promote information sharing and cross-scale learning.

 

A review of current practices suggests the need for national governments to create a sound institutional foundation and knowledge base to support decision making and action at local levels. National governments are also essential to help deliver financial resources to support local action.   Key tools include harmonized GHG inventory methods for local government use and climate risk screening and mapping tools.  Institutions designed to support learning and iterative policy making include establishment of regional science-policy centres or “boundary” organisations, often located in academic institutions, to provide locally-relevant scientific and other expert information, and a means for providers and users of such information to engage in a two-way conversation that leads to usable information.   Strong urban climate policy networks – working horizontally across local actors to exchange information and experience – is another key institution innovation that enhances learning and that is helping to scale up action from the bottom-up.  Designing tools and institutions to strengthen multi-level governance of climate change will help governments to scale up climate action and to find cost-effective climate policy solutions to drive low-carbon, climate resilient development. It will also help national governments to deliver on ambitious climate policy goals in the coming decades.

12:04

Climate governance in Latin America: Case studies of Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru

A. Rudnick (MAPS Programme, Santiago, Chile), I. Rebolledo (Poch Ambiental S.A., Santiago, Chile)

Abstract details
Climate governance in Latin America: Case studies of Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru

A. Rudnick (1) ; I. Rebolledo (2)
(1) MAPS Programme, Latin America, Santiago, Chile; (2) Poch Ambiental S.A., Santiago, Chile

Abstract content

Since 2007, there has been an increase in government institutionalization of climate mitigation actions, and many of these efforts are relatively recent and in design or early implementation stage. There is insufficient literature from developing countries that evaluates this institutionalization. It is important to monitor this trend closely to evaluate if policies and institutions created are sufficiently strong and effective to lead to the reductions required (Working group III, chapter 15, AR5 IPCC ).

The institutional arrangements case studies aim at describing and documenting the governance related to climate change within MAPS Latin American countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru). A case study per each country (Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru) will be conducted to describe and document, from a practitioner´s perspective, the state of the play of the institutional approaches in each country. The results can be useful for other developing countries when examining and enhancing their institutional structures.

The research questions that the country case studies aim to answer are:

•    What institutional arrangements exist in MAPS LAC countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru), at a public and national level, to address climate change?•    What institutions related to climate change mitigation (and adaptation if information is available) exist? •    How are decisions taken at a national and subnational level?•    Are the decisions and actions legally binding? How climate change decisions are institutionalised or implemented?•    If there is information available about how climate change is institutionalised in the private sector, local government and NGOs? •    How have MAPS processes benefitted from certain institutional arrangements? Has there been any changes or additions in the institutional arrangements as a result of MAPS processes or during MAPS processes? Has there been collaboration among MAPS LAC countries to share and learn from certain institutional arrangements?

Note: Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) is a collaboration amongst developing countries to establish the evidence base for long-term transition to robust economies that are both carbon efficient and climate resilient. These processes involve high-level stakeholders in the research process of determining mitigation scenarios for their countries. For more information on the Mitigation Action Plans & Scenarios Programme see www.mapsprogramme.org

12:16

Coordinating adaptation between the municipal and local level: building adaptive capacity of resource poor communities in South Africa

G. Ziervogel (University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa)

Abstract details
Coordinating adaptation between the municipal and local level: building adaptive capacity of resource poor communities in South Africa

G. Ziervogel (1)
(1) University of Cape Town, Environmental and Geographical Science, Cape Town, South Africa

Abstract content

It has been acknowledged that much adaptation to climate change occurs at the city, municipal and community scale. At this local level, both government and local communities need to take action. Both groups needs to strengthen their adaptive capacity and their ability to interact with each other particularly in the face of shocks and stress, as experienced through climate change, resource depletion, economic volatility and increasing inequality.   This paper draws on the experience of the FLOW Programme (Fostering Local Well-being). This is a transdisciplinary research project based in the Bergrivier Municipality, in the Western Cape that seeks to build adaptive capacity of resource poor community members and strengthen their interaction with the municipality. We suggest that individual’s adaptive capacity is dependent on three interdependent dimensions, namely, 1) the development of social cohesion, 2) self-determination, and 3) connection to life-support systems. The paper will explore how the three dimensions that engender adaptive capacity have been built in the case study site.  Specifically, the project has worked with youth ambassadors, local entrepreneurs and the local municipality using a range of interventions including participatory community mapping, resource flow mapping, personal and collective reflective practices, storytelling skills through video journalism and introducing community currencies.  The paper will interrogate the extent to which these interventions have built adaptive capacity and the importance of including this type of work in future climate change adaptation and transformation responses.   

 

Other authors: Anna Cowen and John Ziniades 

 

12:28

Q&A session

S. Agrawala (OECD, Paris, France)

Abstract details
Q&A session
Abstract content