Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

Menu
  • Home
  • Zoom Interactive Programme
Cliquer pour fermer

Thursday 9 July - 15:00-16:30 UPMC Jussieu - Amphi 24

3302 - Key Energy Technologies for Low Carbon Pathways

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): E. Kriegler (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany)

Convener(s): E. Brière (EDF R&D, Clamart, France), F. Carre (CEA, GIF-sur-YVETTE, France)

15:00

The Role of Technology for Achieving Climate Policy Objectives: Overview of the EMF27 Study

E. Kriegler (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany), V. Krey (IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria), J. Weyant (Director, Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), Stanford, CA, United States of America)

Abstract details
The Role of Technology for Achieving Climate Policy Objectives: Overview of the EMF27 Study

E. Kriegler (1) ; V. Krey (2) ; J. Weyant (3)
(1) Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; (2) IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria; (3) Director, Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), Stanford, CA, United States of America

Abstract content

Low-carbon technologies in the energy system have been identified as a key element for mitigating climate change. The relative importance of mitigation technologies depends not only on their techno-economic characteristics and how they develop in the future, but also on the competition with other energy technologies, the development of future energy demand and the climatepolicy architecture. Since all of these factors are interconnected and surrounded by large uncertainty, it is important to investigate technology strategies from a system perspective and under a variety of assumptions.

This presentation gives an overview of results from the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum Study 27, an inter-comparison of 18 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. The study investigated the importance of individual mitigation options such as energy intensity improvements, carbon capture and storage (CCS), nuclear power, solar and wind power and bioenergy for climate mitigation. Limiting the atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration to 450 or 550 ppm CO2 equivalent by 2100 would require a decarbonization of the global energy system in the 21st century. Robust characteristics of the energy transformation are increased energy intensity improvements and the electrification of energy end use coupled with a fast decarbonization of the electricity sector. Non-electric energy end use is hardest to decarbonize, particularly in the transport sector. Technology is a key element of climate mitigation. Versatile technologies such as CCS and bioenergy are found to be most important, due in part to their combined ability to produce negative emissions. The importance of individual low-carbon electricity technologies is more limited due to the many alternatives in the sector. The scale of the energy transformation is larger for the 450 ppm than for the 550 ppmCO2e target. As a result, the achievability and the costs of the 450 ppm target are more sensitive to variations in technology availability.

15:12

Innovation in Renewable Energies and their contribution to combat climate change

P. Frankl (International Energy Agency, Paris, France)

Abstract details
Innovation in Renewable Energies and their contribution to combat climate change
Abstract content
15:24

Is nuclear energy part of the solution?

V. Faudon (Société Française d'Energie Nucléaire, Paris, France)

Abstract details
Is nuclear energy part of the solution?

V. Faudon (1)
(1) Société Française d'Energie Nucléaire, Paris, France

Abstract content

At least 80% of the world’s electricity must be low-carbon by 2050 to keep the world within 2°C of warming, according to the IPCC. This is a massive global challenge that requires the use of all available low-carbon energy technologies. Nuclear energy is recognized by the IPCC as “an effective greenhouse gas mitigation option” with life cycle emissions “comparable to most renewables”.

We need to take immediate steps towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions, as the world has already used up most of its carbon budget.  Nuclear energy is low-carbon, available and competitive in the timeframe required. It has avoided the release of 56 gigatonnes of CO2 since 1971, two years’ worth of emissions at current rates. Additional nuclear energy capacity can be built up in the world’s largest emitting countries: there are more reactors under construction today than at any time in the last 25 years, with BRICS countries leading the way[i].  Existing nuclear power plants are the largest low-carbon electricity source in OECD countries.  Operating them for longer is one of the most effective ways to keep greenhouse gas emissions down. Moreover, nuclear generation can operate with renewables energy in order to adapt generation to electricity demand, taking into account variability of certain renewable energy sources. 

As countries are pursuing different energy policy goals, with different constraints, they should be free to choose from the full portfolio of energy technologies, including renewable energies and nuclear energy,  to reduce CO2 and meet other energy objectives. Very few scenarios have been investigated with  mitigation requirements to limit warming to 2C and implemention of a nuclear phase out.  While they need the largest portfolio now, countries will also need the largest portfolio tomorrow: nuclear research should receive support to develop future reactors(generation 4) that will make better use of the Uranium resources, will operate in a safer way, and produce less waste. Renewable energies and Nuclear have to be considered together as part of the electricity mix on the low carbon pathways 

15:36

Q&A session

Abstract details
Q&A session
Abstract content
15:50

Panel discussion: Introduction by moderator

C. Maisonneuve (IFRI, Paris, France)

Abstract details
Panel discussion: Introduction by moderator
Abstract content
15:52

Non-carbon technology prospects

M. Liebreich (Bloomberg New Energy Finance, London, United Kingdom)

Abstract details
Non-carbon technology prospects
Abstract content
16:02

Renewable energy and energy system dynamics

J. Skea (Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom)

Abstract details
Renewable energy and energy system dynamics
Abstract content
16:07

Response by Paolo Frankl, IEA, France

Abstract details
Response by Paolo Frankl, IEA, France
Abstract content
16:12

Response by Valerie Faudon, SFEN, France

Abstract details
Response by Valerie Faudon, SFEN, France
Abstract content
16:17

Discussion of panelists with audience

Abstract details
Discussion of panelists with audience
Abstract content