Our Common Future Under Climate Change

International Scientific Conference 7-10 JULY 2015 Paris, France

Menu
  • Home
  • Zoom Interactive Programme
Cliquer pour fermer

Thursday 9 July - 17:30-19:00 UPMC Jussieu - Amphi 15

4407 - The Challenges and Opportunities of Multilevel Adaptation Governance

Parallel Session

Lead Convener(s): S. Karsson-Vinkhuyzen (Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands), M.A. Baudoin (University of Cape Town, cape Town, South Africa)

Convener(s): E. Zaccai (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium), M. Lugen (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium)

17:30

Adaptation principles and their application: Effective determinants for multilevel climate governance?

S. Kreft (United Nations University, Bonn, Germany)

Abstract details
Adaptation principles and their application: Effective determinants for multilevel climate governance?

S. Kreft (1)
(1) United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security, Bonn, Germany

Abstract content

The UNFCCC COP 21 climate summit in Paris at the end of 2015 is expected to yield a new agreement on climate change, that will provide the framework for international climate policy cooperation in the coming decades. Advancing adaptation to climate change is a political priority for many countries, especially island states and least developed countries, and a major expectation towards the outcome of COP 21.

At the international level there are emerging norms on the conduct of adaptation interventions – for instance through adaptation principles stipulated by the UNFCCC’s Cancun Adaptation Framework decided in 2010. The presentation addresses the question of how these principles are taken into account in programming adaptation actions by international climate funds and bilateral initiatives. Initial results based on a standardized analysis of board and programme policy documents as well as project documentation point to an uneven uptake and effect of internationally agreed adaptation principles on these institutions. I use these insights to discuss the effect of broad level policy principles on multilevel climate governance and adaptation practice, and to debate the relevance of an evolution of adaptation norms in the context of advancing the climate regime in Paris.

 

17:50

Challenges of scales: exploring pathways to integrate locally-developed adaptation initiatives with national and regional development plans and adaptation policies

S. Huq (International Center for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), Dhaka, Bangladesh)

Abstract details
Challenges of scales: exploring pathways to integrate locally-developed adaptation initiatives with national and regional development plans and adaptation policies
Abstract content
18:02

Opportunities for municipal climate adaptation: aligning local adaptation plans with provincial and national policy in South Africa

G. Ziervogel (University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa)

Abstract details
Opportunities for municipal climate adaptation: aligning local adaptation plans with provincial and national policy in South Africa

G. Ziervogel (1)
(1) University of Cape Town, Environmental and Geographical Science, Cape Town, South Africa

Abstract content

While some argue for a dedicated policy domain to focus on reducing climate impacts, others suggest that more comprehensive responses that integrate climate into existing policy domains are important. This presentation seeks to share the opportunities that enabled a local government municipality in South Africa, the Bergrivier municipality, to develop an adaptation plan that aligned with local development policy, provincial climate change initiatives and developments in national climate policy. We suggest that multiple opportunities converged to enable a municipal plan to be rapidly developed through a collaborative process that aligned with policy across different levels. The process built on the successful partnership between a range of scientists, local government and provincial government actors that worked together to develop a municipal adaptation plan. Key elements of success include ways that scientists worked with different levels of government, the flexibility of the process and the knowledge sharing and capacity strengthening this enabled.  This knowledge exchange helped to strengthen understanding across the science - policy - practice divide, resulting in climate scientists having a better understanding of the multiplicitous complexity of local level governance and service delivery challenges, and by the same token, provincial and local officials and councilors gaining a better understanding of the complexity involved in producing locally relevant climate information.  The research suggests that mainstreaming local climate adaptation plans with local development plans on one side and aligning local climate adaptation plans with provincial and national priorities on the other side, can help to create a conducive environment to co-producing local adaptation plans that aim to reduce both specific climate risk and meet generic socio-economic development needs.

 

18:14

Limits and opportunities of private finance for adaptation in Least Developed Countries

D. Adis (Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden), T. Corrado (Stockholm Environment Institute, York, United Kingdom), P. Pauw (German Development Institute, DIE, Bonn, Germany)

Abstract details
Limits and opportunities of private finance for adaptation in Least Developed Countries

D. Adis (1) ; T. Corrado (2) ; P. Pauw (3)
(1) Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; (2) Stockholm Environment Institute, York, United Kingdom; (3) German Development Institute, DIE, Bonn, Germany

Abstract content

Interest in private finance for climate resilience is increasing rapidly. A wide range of actors – finance institutions, intergovernmental organizations, policy-makers, negotiators, research institutions, insurers and reinsurers, and private investors themselves – have been quick to join efforts to further identify opportunities for private investment in developing countries. However, it is far from clear how the private sector might make a substantial contribution, particularly for adaptation, where attempts to assess the finance landscape have so far been unsuccessful. Research has shown that private adaptation finance has yet to prove its worth and the role of the private sector in adaptation and adaptation finance has received little attention from developing countries in the UNFCCC climate change regime.

 

This paper considers the limits and opportunities to stimulating private sector contributions for climate-resilient development. Its focus is on three aspects of climate finance governance – enabling environments, established and innovative mobilisation mechanisms, and delivery mechanisms – as well as their ability to ensure scaled-up finance for climate resilience, and developing-country accessibility to this finance.

 

Specifically, the paper questions the potential of private finance for adaptation in Least Developed Countries (LCDs). National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) are used to indicate overall national adaptation priorities, and complemented with national development plans for selected countries. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is analysed as a proxy for where foreign private sector investment flows autonomously. This is complemented with qualitative assessments of alternative forms of private investments, including green bonds, risk guarantees and mutual approaches. Through policy analysis and semi-structured interviews the paper: 1) highlights the institutional and regulatory frameworks, as well as knowledge and cognitive aspects, which are currently a barrier for an investment friendly enabling environment for the private sector; 2) the paper assesses existing and innovative mechanisms for mobilisation of private sector investment; and 3) the paper’s third focus on delivery mechanisms maps private sector investments through participation (purely private and public-private) and scale (micro, meso, macro).

 

It is found that private sector flows to adaptation priority sectors are scarce, and their impacts on resilience often unclear. Increasing these flows would require that country-specific challenges be addressed. The paper highlights a lack of innovative mechanisms for LDCs and discusses limits and opportunities for multilateral climate funds, such as the Green Climate Fund, to attract and leverage private finance for adaptation in key sectors, including food security, water resources, health, and energy security and access. It concludes that climate funds need to seek a combination of climate change adaptation and social and economic development and employment in order to maximise private sector contribution, both financial and non-financial.

18:26

Bridging Communication and Trust Building for Local Climate Adaptation: A Case study of Tainan, Taiwan

R. Chen (Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan), H. C. Lee (National Central University, Chung Li, Taiwan)

Abstract details
Bridging Communication and Trust Building for Local Climate Adaptation: A Case study of Tainan, Taiwan

R. Chen (1) ; HC. Lee (2)
(1) Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan Province (People's Republic of China); (2) National Central University, Chung Li, Taiwan Province (People's Republic of China)

Abstract content

Local implementation is a key to the overall efforts in response to climate change. In local settings, adaptation planning copes not only with various consequences induced by climate change, but the multiple interests raised by those affected stakeholders. Dissonance is commonly seen among different sectors with regard to agenda setting and resource prioritization. This study, as a part of state-funded program, “Taiwan Climate Change Adaptation Technology” (TaiCCAT), is designed to reveal and remedy the discrepancy among different policy sectors by focusing on a Taiwanese city, Tainan.

 

With a long colonial history Tainan is a vivid city of tourism and cultural events. However, as a municipality Tainan has an extensive jurisdiction covering urban, coastal, and rural areas. This diversity in life styles and ecosystems has invited severe vulnerability to extreme weather and its impacts, both floods and droughts. The primary investigation of this study has shown there are a series of asymmetries existing in policy participation, information sharing, resource allocation, and action taking among different sectors. Employing social network analysis, text mining techniques, and co-design research principles, this study further examines the contents of these discrepancies and aims to identify the key actors who are in the best network positions to smooth the channels of communication and trust building for local adaptation initiatives and water resource management.

18:38

Discussion

Abstract details
Discussion
Abstract content